c/n 572

N95DG at Anchorage, AK.
Photo: Rich Hulina © June 2014
N95DG of Sheldon Air Service at Talkeetna.
Photo: Fred Wallis © 31 May 2010
N95DG when with JP Air at Bethel, Alaska.
Photo: Martin Prince Jnr © 12 November 2009
N95DG when parked at Fairbanks International.
Photo: Marcel Fluet-Lecerf © 20 July 2007 - Aird Archives
N95DG at Cabin Creek on those beautiful go almost anywhere
35 x 15 x 10's.
Photos: David Russell ©16 April 2004 - via Wup Winn
N95DG on the pond at Fairbanks.
Photo: Chuck Stewart © July 1999 - Aird Archives
Photo: Lukas Lusser © 22 June 1999
N95DG at Vancouver, before and after new paint.
Photo: Unknown photographer © June 1996 - Aird Archives
Photo: Erik Johannesson © 25 May 1995
C-GPVF with Baxter Logo.
Photo: John Kimberley © February 1991 - Michael J. Ody Collection
C-GPVF departing Vancouver's Coal Harbour.
Photos: William Jesse © July 1988 - Aird Archives
C-GPVF when operating with Air Dogrib.
Photo: Unknown photographer © Pete Killin Collection
C-GPVF on the gravel.
Photo: Sheldon D. Benner © July 1981 - Michael J. Ody Collection
53-2786 designated an RU-6A
Photo: via "Sakk" Frankenfield ©
Photos: via Dennis Buley ©   

c/n 572

53-2786 • N9258Z • C-GPVF

N95DG*

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53-2786 US Army # 1329 L-20 No: 330 Command A-4. Delivered 23-Nov-1953. Built as L-20A and re-designated U-6A in 1962. Later re-designated RU-6A with 146th Aviation Company (RR) based at Long Thanh North, Saigon, Vietnam.

Accident: 04 Dec-1967. Location 21 mi SW of Da Nang. Crashed into trees while low flying.The mission began at11:30 hours, 4 Dec 1967, when the crew members assembled in the 138th Aviation Company (Radio Research) operations, where they received a mission briefing concerning their proposed flight which was to commence at 12:30 hours and end at 16:30 hours. At the time of take off, the Da Nang weather forecast was 2,500 feet scattered, estimated 5,000 feet broken, 7,000 feet overcast ceiling with 12 miles visibility and very light rain showers. The temperature was 78⁰, dewpoint 69. winds calm nd barometer pressure 3002 inches. After the briefing, the crew members moved to the flight line where the pilot pre-flighted the aircraft while the crew member operators stowed their gear. The RU-6A aircraft took off from the Da Nang Air Force Base at approximately 12:25 hours end departed South to their operational are. Since the mission this aircraft was conducting is highly classified, no further mention will be made of its objectives except to disclose that it required orbiting particular areas of an assigned sector.

Initially, the aircraft was flown over relatively flat coastal terrain, however after approximately fifteen to twenty minutes the nature of the terrain changed abruptly to mountains interspersed with steep canyon walls and one major river valley known as the "Song Vu Gia" river. At 12:30 hours the pilot made a radio call requesting flight following service with the local flight following facility. He advised them of his intended area of operation and the anticipated time duration. No further information is known concerning the route of the flight except that on occasion they flew close to the ground. Sometime between 14:00 and 14:30 hours the aircraft was in the process of making a series of turns close to the ground in mountainous terrain when it struck the trees and ground on a heading of 315⁰, and at an approximate 45⁰ angle. Prior to impact with the ground, the aircraft penetrated dense jungle vegetation, consisting of thick bamboo, brush and scattered hard wood trees. The impact with these trees severed the left wing from the remainder of the fuselage and further caused the aircraft to either spin or cartwheel in such a manner that it came to rest 180⁰ from its flight path. The right wing was partially under the fuselage and the cabin passenger compartment was buckled. Amazingly enough, two crew members survived, and after considerable difficulty. and delay caused by deteriorating weather and inability to locate the wreckage they were lifted out in a basket lowered by a hovering HH-3 (Jolly Green Giant) helicopter from the 37th Aerospace Rescue and·Recovery Squadron, USAF.

In the attempt to recover the wreckage the United States Marines provided two CH-46 and two UH-1B armed helicopters. The Special Forces provided four security personnel.

All authoritative sources recommended that only the minimum number of necessary personnel needed actually be let down into the crash site because of the known enemy hostility in the area, and in addition, to minimize the exposure of the hovering CH-46 helicopters. This was evidenced by attempts on 5 December to extract classified information from the wreckage when one crew member from the 37th Aerospace Rescue Squadron (Jolly Green Giant) was wounded by enemy small arms fire. In addition, two marine UH-1B armed helicopters gun Ships were lost and four crew members killed when they inadvertently flew into one of the mountains while assisting this recovery.


• N9258Z Details unknown.

*Note: It is unclear to several interested parties as to how this reportedly destroyed aircraft became an item on the FAA Register .

C-GPVF Imported to Canada. Dec-1976.

C-GPVF Centralia Aircraft Sales Ltd., Orangeville, ON. Regd and canx prior to Certificate of Airworthiness renewal dated 07-Dec-1977.

C-GPVF Steinwands Transport Ltd., Rae, NT. Regd prior to Certificate of Airworthiness renewal dated 07-Dec-1977. Canx 09-Jul-1987.

Accident: Bathurst Inlet, NT, 01-Jun-1978. Substantial damage.

C-GPVF Tyee Airways Ltd., Sechelt, BC. Regd 24-Nov-1988. Canx 13-Jun-1990

C-GPVF Baxter Aviation Ltd., Nanaimo, BC. Regd 13-Jun-1990. Canx 19-Jun-1991, on export to USA.

Airworthiness Date: 28-Jun-1991.

N95DG Aircraft Marketing and Leasing, Fairbanks, AK. Regd 20-Jun-1991. Temp C of A terminated 20-Jul-1991. On USCAR at Dec-1995. Regd 09-Apr-2009. Canx 04-May-2012.

N95DG Airwolf Enterprises LLC., Anchorage, AK. Regd 07-Jun-2012.

N95DG Intricate Bay Operating LLC., Oil City, PA • Regd 20-Mar-2015.

Current

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