c/n 37
C-FDTI at Vancouver in Harbour Air colours.
Photo: © Gary McLeod
C-FDTI on wheels at YVR.
Photo: John Kimberley © January 1990
C-FDTI does fly-by at Abbotsford.
Photo: Kenneth I. Swartz ©
C-FDTI coming back ashore.
Photo: Unknown photographer © October 1983 - Aird Archives
C-FDTI heading down the ramp.
Photo: Kenneth I. Swartz © Slide processed March 1983
C-FDTI on amphib setup.
Photo: John Kimberley © March 1980 - Kenneth I. Swartz Collection
C-FDTI on wheels, before window mod.
Photo: Gary Vincent © March 1979 - Aird Archives
Photo: Kenneth I. Swartz © 15 May 1976
C-FDTI at Nanaimo, BC.
Photo: John P. Stewart © September 1975 - Aird Archives
C-FDTI at Vancouver.
Photo: Unknown photographer © 1973 - Aird Archives
C-FDTI at Hope, British Columbia.
Photo: Syl Dzus © mid 1970's - via Doug Dzus
C-FDTI with Captain Cy Leyland attending.
Photo: Syl Dzus © mid 1970's - via Doug
CF-DTI in early markings at Miners Bay.
Photo: Syl Dzus © early 1970's - via Doug Dzus
CF-DTI at Vancouver - CYVR.
Photo: J. Zwart © 28 April 1972 - Aird Archives
CF-DTI on her amphibs.
Photo: Norman Eastaff © Date unknown - Janic Geelen Collection

c/n 37

CF-DTI

C-FDTI

• CF-DTI & C-FDTI Government of Canada, Department of Transport, Ottawa, ON. Tail number “963” later “504” Vancouver, BC. Delivered 05-Jul-1949. Regn format changed prior to Mar-1975. On CCAR for May-1981.

Accident: Alert Bay, BC. 04-Nov-1981. Aircraft flipped over on landing suffering substantial damage. Pilot and passengers received fatal injuries.

• C-FDTI Transport Canada Aircraft Services Directorate, Yellowknife, NT. Regd 31-Jan-1991. Canx 01-Feb-1994.

• C-FDTI Harbour Air, Richmond, BC. Regd 16-Feb-1994.

Accident: Near Hunter Point, Sandspit, BC, 23-Jun-1994. The amphibious de Havilland DHC-2 Beaver departed from a floating fishing resort with the pilot, one passenger, and a load of fish on board, for a thirty minute flight to Sandspit, BC. When the aircraft did not arrive at Sandspit, a search was organized. The aircraft was later found submerged in the water without its wings at Hunter Point, about seven nautical miles from the point of departure. The pilot and passenger had been fatally injured and the aircraft was destroyed. The Board determined that the aircraft likely stalled at an altitude insufficient to permit a recovery. The reason why the aircraft may have stalled could not be determined.  A94PO121.

http://www.tsb.gc.ca/eng/rapports-reports/aviation/1994/a94p0121/a94p0121.asp

• C-FDTI TSB file shows aircraft destroyed by impact and exposure to the ocean surf.

 Destroyed